Home Church community High Point Church hosts community vaccination clinic

High Point Church hosts community vaccination clinic

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As the delta variant becomes the dominant strain of COVID-19 in North Carolina, there is a new push to get a vaccine right now. A vaccination clinic in High Point tries to reach people where they are. Organizers call the event “Bring Summer Back” because they say that every person who receives a COVID-19 vaccine at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in High Point brings everyone a bit closer to normalcy. is like a party inside. Admission is a COVID-19 vaccine and the price includes a $ 25 charge card and a lesson from the Old North State Medical Society. The group runs immunization clinics throughout the city. ‘State. “We are really happy that you came, got vaccinated, and more importantly, you received information and you received education,” said Hugh Holston, senior project manager at Old North State Medical Society. As one of the oldest medical societies for black doctors in the country, the group hopes its history, combined with the location of the clinic, will make the vaccine more accessible and reliable. “They know we’ve been a part of this community since 1887. They know us, they trust us. They come to us about all the other problems they have. And now the problem is COVID-19 and vaccine reluctance. Bringing the vaccine to the people has been the primary goal of Mt. Zion Baptist Church. As a safe and walkable community site, Reverend Frank Thomas says Mt. Zion is the perfect location for this event. One of the event’s medics has vaccinated people in Guilford County for months, but he says it’s the delta variant that makes people get vaccinated. right now. This leads to worse hospitalizations and worse outcomes for those who are not vaccinated, “said Dr. Brian Shackleford of the Old North State Medical Society. Shackleford added that studies show that 99.5% of people who have died from the virus have not been vaccinated s. Community leaders and doctors say they will continue to work to convince people of the safety of the vaccine wherever they go because sometimes it works. getting over this pandemic is awesome, ”Shackleford said. Shackleford is stationed at 600 Gorrell St. in Greensboro Tuesday through Saturday each week, administering the vaccine.

As the delta variant becomes the dominant strain of COVID-19 in North Carolina, there is a new push to get a vaccine right now.

A vaccination clinic in High Point tries to reach people where they are.

Organizers call the event “Bring Summer Back” because they say that every person who receives a COVID-19 vaccine at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in High Point brings everyone a bit closer to normalcy.

It’s like a party inside. Admission is a COVID-19 vaccine, and the price includes a $ 25 charge card and a lesson from the Old North State Medical Society.

The group operates immunization clinics statewide.

“We are really happy that you came, that you were vaccinated and, most importantly, that you received information and education,” said Hugh Holston, senior project manager at Old North State Medical Society.

As one of the oldest medical societies for black doctors in the country, the group hopes its history, combined with the location of the clinic, will make the vaccine more accessible and reliable.

“They know we’ve been a part of this community since 1887. They know us, they trust us. They come to us for all the other issues they have. And now the problem is COVID-19 and the reluctance. vaccination. ”says Holston.

Bringing the vaccine to the people has been the main goal of Mt. Baptist Church of Zion.

As a safe and walkable community site, Reverend Frank Thomas says Mt. Zion Baptist Church is the perfect location for this event.

One of the medics at the event has been vaccinating people in Guilford County for months, but he says it’s the delta variant that is driving people to get vaccinated right now.

“Young people are getting sicker and sicker. This leads to worse hospitalizations and worse outcomes for those who are not vaccinated,” said Dr. Brian Shackleford of the Old North State Medical Society.

Shackleford added that studies show that 99.5% of people who have died from the virus have not been vaccinated.

Community leaders and doctors say they will continue to work to convince people of the safety of the vaccine wherever they go because sometimes it works.

“To see someone who didn’t trust the vaccine finally trust the science behind it and become protected and finally get over this pandemic is great,” Shackleford said.

Shackleford is stationed at 600 Gorrell St. in Greensboro Tuesday through Saturday each week, administering the vaccine.