Home Church community Memories of the Palatine city councilor invite to the opening of the church’s time capsule

Memories of the Palatine city councilor invite to the opening of the church’s time capsule

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Here’s Good News Sunday, a compilation of some of the most upbeat and inspiring stories recently published by the Daily Herald:

A boy was in awe of the Palatine Church’s time capsule. Fifty years later, it brought about its opening.

Without the memory of a 5-year-old boy, a time capsule in a palatine church would not have seen the light of day for who knows how long – maybe never.

The capsule was extracted on September 9 from an approximately 450-pound cornerstone drilled outside the United Church of Christ St. Paul, 144 E. Palatine Road. It contained things like American flags, a religious newspaper, coins and various papers in German and English dating from the 1800s to 1971. All of the content was displayed in public during the celebration of the 150th anniversary of the church.

None of this would have happened if Brad Helms, now 55, had not remembered his admiration when the capsule was last opened in 1971, when the church celebrated its 100th anniversary.

“I remember they cut off the corner of the church,” said Helms, who is now a city councilor in the Palatine. “I was one of those kids who sort of wanted to know everything, and I remember thinking, ‘Damn, if they cut the corner, won’t the tower collapse?’ “

For the full story, click here.

New program aims to get black youth interested in farming

Jocelyn Harris, left, and Jordan Jones observe the progress of a tomato plant growing in an EarthBox on July 18. The gardening effort is part of the inaugural “Young Black Agri-takers of Kane County” program, which aims to engage and train future black farmers in Kane County. Jones participates in the program and Harris serves as his mentor.
– Courtesy of the Fox Valley Just Food Initiative

Jordan Jones, 15, of Oswego is an early participant in the “Young Black Agri-preneurs of Kane County” program, a collaborative effort between The Just Food Initiative of Fox Valley, a nonprofit based in Batavia, and the African American Men of Unity, a nonprofit group based in Aurora.

The Agri-Takers program aims to engage and train future black farmers in Kane County, where there are few, if any, such farmers. The program’s classes started in April, with around 10 young participants learning where their food comes from, the importance of healthy soil and careers in agriculture.

Currently, several boys in the program – including Jones – are participating in a wrap-up activity where they planted gardens in their respective homes using an EarthBox, specially designed containers for growing plants.

North Aurora resident Jocelyn Harris serves as Jones’ mentor and helped him establish his garden, which includes squash and tomato plants.

“To have the opportunity to teach someone younger than me how to grow their own food… I feel so grateful to be able to do that,” said Harris.

For the full story, click here.

Work begins on an accessible playground at Lake Zurich


A render is on the site where a new disabled-accessible playground called Peg's Place will be built at The Hope Collective Church on Lake Zurich.  A sale of lemonade and popcorn has recently been organized to help the project.

A render is on the site where a new disabled-accessible playground called Peg’s Place will be built at The Hope Collective Church on Lake Zurich. A sale of lemonade and popcorn was recently organized to help the project.
-Paul Valade | Staff photographer

After a successful community fundraising effort, work will begin on Friday to build an accessible $ 309,000 playground for children with disabilities on the grounds of The Hope Collective Church on Lake Zurich.

Children who use wheelchairs will have full access to the equipment, which includes a swing that they can use without getting out of their wheelchair. There will also be play equipment for children with sensory disabilities such as blindness and for children who cannot communicate.

Donna Riemer, an outreach pastor in Hope, said community members donated $ 172,000 for the project.

“We have overflowing hearts and grateful that they also grasped the vision,” Riemer said of the community’s support.

The playground will be called Peg’s Park in honor of Peggy Britcliffe, who died in 2019 after a life spent working with severely disabled children at Swedish Hospital in Chicago. Riemer said Britcliffe’s trust contributed $ 137,000 to the project.

For the full story, click here.

Naperville is on Money’s list of Best Places to Live

Only one city in Illinois has been on Money’s annual list of the 50 Best Places to Live in the United States, and that’s Naperville.

At No. 45, Money praised Naperville’s sporting history, which includes Olympic gold medalists Candace Parker, Evan Lysacek and Kevin Cordes. Money also noted Edward Hospital as one of the state’s top hospitals and Route 59 as a major retail corridor.

Money highlighted entertainment options in Naperville including the Last Fling, India Day Parade and Celebration, Riverwalk, DuPage Children’s Museum, and Centennial Beach.

According to Money, while house prices jumped 10% on average for most of the other Top 50 cities in the first quarter of 2021, house prices in Naperville only rose 5%.

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